5 Ideas For Building ATV Ramps

Contributed by Jason Mueller

Loading an ATV into a truck seems like it would be a simple task to handle. However, it can not only be difficult but it can be dangerous. One thing to keep in mind is being safe when loading or unloading your ATV and you need to make sure you have the proper ramps to hold the weight of the bike and easily load it into the trailer. Whether you’re taking your ATV to the woods to get in a little playtime on a long trail ride or you just need to relocate the ATV, using the right ramps and loading techniques will go a long way to maintaining the condition of your ATV.

ATV ramps should not be pieces of flat wood or metal you may have laying around your tool shop. They need to be carefully chosen from a store or designed and crafted from the right material to handle the machine you want to load. You will need to be certain that the ramps are the right length for your truck bed or trailer. Modern trucks tend to be a little higher off the ground than some of the older trucks, so you will want to buy or build longer ramps if you plan to do the work on your own. You’ll also need to know how much your ATV weighs. This is extremely important when determining the materials to use on the ramp build.

In some instances, if you don’t own a truck or trailer to haul your own ATV, you can always contact an ATV shipping company (Canada, USA). The following ideas for building ramps to load ATVs in and out of trucks or trailers are great for those who are handy with building things, but alternatively, ramps can be purchased from an ATV shop or even a hardware shop locally.

Aluminum Diamond Plate Ramps

Using 3/16” aluminum diamond plate, a lot of weight can be held and it provides a sturdy, solid surface for ATVs. Making them around 5 feet long, you can bend up two channels and tie them together. Welding can be done for strength, but it is not necessary. Adding 4” tubes in the curls of the aluminum provides more strength to the ramps, making them ideal for moving ATVs.

Heavy Duty Steel Loading Ramps

Using 2×10 pieces of steel with a 3”x3/16 angle of iron down each of the sides provides more support. You do not have to weld the pieces together, but bolt each of the areas down. Adding ramp ends from a hardware store can provide even more stability and provide a way for the ramp to easily connect to the trailer or truck and ground.

Wood and Velcro

2×12 with 1/4” angled iron on one end of each board. Add industrial strength Velcro on the bottom sides of each one. This helped reduce slipping when pushing the ATV up the wood and into the bed of the truck.

Alternatively, you could screw eye bolts into the sides of the ends. Use tie downs to lock them in place on the bed of the truck so they do not slip, instead of the Velcro. Cutting the 2×12 in half so each is 6’ is ideal. Cutting them too short or keeping them too long puts too much stress on the wood. Remember wood is slick when wet so caution is recommended.

Wood with Supports

Using 2-2×6’s with 1×2’s every foot or so up each board provides more support when loading and unloading the ATV. Placing a 1×2 at the top of the board, as well as the bottom provides additional support so they do not slip out of place when being used. Again, slick when wet.

Treated Wood with Angles

Treated 2-2×12’s with 2×2 angles along each side of the 2×12’s provides additional support. The 2×2 angles helps with slippage since the angle holds onto the ends where they are placed. Making them just over 4 feet long is adequate to load the quads into a trailer without slippage and the treated wood is heartier, making them a more durable solution.

Remember, it is always recommended that you test for safety. It is better to be safe than sorry when it comes to loading your quad up, only to find out the ramp cannot hold the weight. Also, loading into the back of a trailer that is low to the ground, rather than into a higher elevated truck, is much easier to do when using ramps.

See also:          Keeping It Safe On the Trail          New Riders



 

Trail Maintenance & Repair (2017)

Dufferin Grey ATV Club Inc. was incorporated in 2006. That means 2017 is our eleventh year of operation.

Our signs are starting to show our age!

Along the trail you will see signs that have deteriorated. Plywood backing has rotted and dropped our signs upon the ground.

Rest assured that our Volunteers are fixing them.

Our Volunteers are also mowing the grass along the trail and trimming the grass around the signs.  However, this year with so much intermittent rain, it is hard to line up the Volunteers with the equipment and the sunshine.  So be patient — we are working on it.

If you can’t be patient then Volunteer to help!  We are also happy to provide community hours for students.

Even an afternoon of painting posts, trimming the grass around sign posts, or taking fallen trees and brush off the trail (if you have your chainsaw licence) is a help.

Or simply report the problem area to us by sending a photo and location details to info@dgatv.ca to ensure that we know where it is.

So look forward to seeing our brand new signs on the trail, and if you want to help out don’t hesitate to call!

(Thanks to Jake for the shown repair and photos.)

See also:

Benefits of Being a Club Member            Warden Responsibilities           FAQs



 

Keeping It Safe On The Trail

Contributed by Jason Mueller

Side by Side 001

ATV riding may just be one of the best activities that you can do outdoors. It is also an activity that needs to be done safely whether you have been riding for years or are completely new to the sport. When it comes to having fun riding an ATV, there is no time for an accident while on a long and rugged trail or even if you are riding in an ATV event and taking a few precautions can really help to ensure that your ride goes smoothly and ends with great memories instead of bandages or a cast. To prevent an accident while on your ATV and keep it as safe as possible when you are on the trail, keep these tips in mind before you hop on your ATV.

Never Ride Alone

First and foremost, when you are planning a ride be sure to have a buddy go along with you. Accidents can and do happen all the time and riding alone can be very dangerous. Even if you simply run out of gas or have a mechanical issue, having a friend around with a way out can really help when a bad situation arises. On top of that, nothing makes an ATV ride quite as fun as when you have someone to ride and have fun with.

Stay On The Trail

Unless you are an experienced trail rider and know your way around the wilderness, be sure to stay on the trail at all times when you ride. Venturing off into the woods may seem like a great idea when you are out for a rugged ride, but getting off the trail is a great way to get lost as well as tear up your ATV. Riding in areas that are not specifically for ATV riding can be a hazard to your ATV just as much as it can be for you.  Additionally, there is a good chance that the land is subject to land-use agreements between the ATV club and the land-owner/steward, so leaving the trail is trespassing and jeopardizes those agreements, which may result in the loss of that part of the trail.  There is never a reason to head off trail and risk having an accident where other riders may not be able to easily locate you to help.

Wear Your Gear

It may not seem cool to ride with a helmet, but keeping your head safe is extremely important. It is also important to wear the rest of your gear including gloves, boots and goggles during a ride. Your gear was made to help protect you during a ride and should always be worn to cut down the risk that you will be hurt when you are out. This goes for you as well as anyone you may be riding with or anyone that may be riding on the ATV with you. If someone will be riding with you, the ATV should be factory standard to seat two or more safely.

Use the Right-Sized ATV

If it is too large to handle, do not even attempt to ride it. Riders should only ride what they can safely handle and this goes for you as well as anyone that you may ride with. If you have young children or younger teens, never place them on an ATV that has a motor that is too powerful for their age or level of expertise. When you purchase a new ATV, the sales person will be able to show you the right ones for your age as well as your size and level of experience. If you buy one from a seller online or at auction and need to have an ATV shipper (Canada, USA) it to you, be sure that it is the right size before you place your order.

Be Serious When Riding

There is probably nothing riskier than someone showing off on an ATV. When you are riding, you need to make sure that you never do anything foolish to try to impress someone. Trying to do stunts or other things that you have never done or should not be doing in the first place is a good way to have a dangerous accident.

Alcohol and Fatigue

It is also wise to never ride when you are tired and especially if you are drinking or taking medication that could cause you to become drowsy or not be able to handle the ATV safely. Fatigued or drunk driving is just as dangerous on an ATV as they would be if you were driving a car down the freeway and there is never a reason to risk your safety or the safety of others.

While these are all well-known issues that can affect the safety of an ATV rider, it is wise to strictly adhere to them to make sure that you, and any passengers you may be riding with will remain safe while venturing out on the trail. ATV riding is known to be very extreme as well as a fun and exciting way to spend a day in the woods or on the dirt track and with that excitement comes a great deal of responsibility to keep things safe at all times.

The tips above are obvious and obvious for a reason. Most, if not all, are practically unwritten rules in ATV world. Safety is always a priority and most rules factor in safety for you and others. Also, it’s a good idea to keep in mind the “house rules” when riding a track or designated ATV trails and knowing provincial/state rules like spark arrestors.

See also:          New Riders           Young Riders           Horseback Riders          Invasive Species



 

Invasive Species

Invasive Species are Spreading

According to the Government of Ontario, invasive species are a menace to our environment, our economy and our health. When an invasive species arrives in an area, it is almost impossible to get rid of, causing damage that we can never repair.

How You Can Help

You can help stop the spread of invasive species by:

  • reporting sightings
  • properly manage any species you find on your property
  • knowing and following the rules for invasive species
  • report any illegal activity involving invasive species
  • cleaning your ATV before and after riding in a new area.

If you have a question about Ontario’s invasive species rules, call the Natural Resources Information Centre at 1-800-667-1940.

Click here for more information.

See also:          www.ontario.ca



 

Kimberley Forest

Kimberley Forest, Grey Highlands

Kimberley Forest extends roughly from the Beaver River west to the 7th Line, and north from the Beaver Valley Ski Club almost to the former Talisman Ski Resort. ATV riding is not permitted. Map courtesy of Google.

Stretching for close to 1,000 acres and nearly two and a half kilometers along the west side of the Beaver Valley, the Kimberley Forest extends north from the Beaver Valley Ski Club nearly to the former Talisman Ski Resort.  For the most part, this large tract of public land extends up the escarpment from the Beaver River in the valley west to the 7th Line.

North and west of the provincial Crown lands managed by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) are the Wodehouse Karst property, owned by the Grey Sauble Conservation Authority, and Kimberley Springs, owned by the Bruce Trail Conservancy.  The entire area is located in the Municipality of Grey Highlands.  In the past this area was loosely referred to as the Wodehouse Karst but for convenience the entire area is now being referred to as the ‘Kimberley Forest’.

The Friends of Kimberley Forest

Representatives of all the major user groups – hikers, horseback riders, mountain-bikers, hunters, snowshoers, XC skiers, snowmobilers and ATV’ers, as well as Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), Grey Sauble Conservation Authority (GSCA) and the Bruce Trail Conservancy (BTC) have joined together to participate in a volunteer steering committee called “The Friends of Kimberley Forest”. The committee meets monthly in co-operative agreement to improve forest management and provide management options for community consideration.

Dufferin Grey ATV Club has agreed to stay out of Kimberley Forest and asks members and other ATV riders to honour our commitment.  Please recognize that some areas are simply off limits and if we want to keep riding then we must play by the rules or risk losing everything.  DGATV thanks you for your consideration.



 

Annual Membership Fee

Let’s Talk About The Money

Your Ontario Federation of ATV Clubs (OFATV) annual membership costs $150, which is $132.74 plus HST.

75% of your membership dollars are used to build and maintain trails.
25% of your membership dollars pays for administration — $15 million landowners liability insurance, government lobbying, safety programs, youth training, special projects and the operating expenses of the OFATV.

To see money spent on your favourite trails, join the local club and buy where you ride.

Buy an annual membership through Dufferin Grey ATV Club Inc. (DGATV) and:

$65 is retained by DGATV
$85 is forwarded to the OFATV with approximately $45 returned to DGATV as payment for maintaining each km of verified trail (currently around 350 kms off-road). This trail verification payment is a trail building incentive managed by the OFATV and varies for each club.

DGATV is run entirely by volunteers.  OFATV has one paid Administrator and is managed by Volunteers.  To learn more and have a voice in the future of recreational ATVing, get involved.  Many hands make light work!

See also:     VOLUNTEERS          MEMBERSHIP INFO       ATV SEASON       BENEFITS       SIDE-BY-SIDES