Trail Crew – Cleaning up the Mess (2017)

It is one thing for our volunteer Trail Crew to be out keeping the trail clear of fallen trees, filling ruts, and picking up rail spikes.

It is another thing to be picking up someone else’s dumped garbage.

This photos show the before and after shot of the Markdale parking lot.

Thanks to our Trail Captain who personally cleaned up the mess.

See also:

Trail Crew – Hard at Work

FAQs



 

Message from DGATV’s President (October 2017)

Welcome to all our new Members!

We would like to remind everyone that we are a member of the Ontario Federation of ATV Clubs. An OFATV trail permit is required to ride on all our trails.

“Buy Where You Ride” is the OFATV motto to support the clubs. Not only does the permit allow you to ride the trails, it also makes you a voting member, and a major portion of your permit funds goes to the club you selected to join.

Permit funds are used by the clubs for trail development, maintenance and repairs. Additionally, each club is responsible for getting road use and land-owner approvals in their area.

The bonus is that your trail permit allows access to all fifteen (15) OFATV clubs’ trail systems and all Eastern Ontario Trail Alliance (EOTA) trails as well. An awesome deal!

For more information see www.ofatv.org.

See you on the trails!

Tim Allen, President 

See also:

Membership Info

FAQs



 

Trail Crew – Hard At Work

 

DGATV’s Executive, Wardens and Trail Crew are hard at work keeping the trails in good shape for the summer.

Trails are monitored for the safety of all users — hikers, bikers, ATVers, and horseback riders.

Fallen trees are cut.  Gaping holes are filled.  Sign posts are cleared of grass and brush.

Parking areas are trimmed and mowed.

If you see an area that needs maintenance, please let us know at info@dgatv.ca.

If you want a great excuse to get out on the trails AND help support the club, become a Warden.

Or if you are the handyman-type, wanting to ride and preferring to work here and there, talk to our Trail Captain (519.266.3559 ext. 3).

Every little bit helps!

A big Thank You to all of our trail workers, we couldn’t do it without YOU!

See also:

FAQs



 

Trail Loss – Inconsiderate Riders

Inconsiderate riders have resulted in loss of trail.

The landowner contacted us, annoyed at all riders — members or otherwise.

Pay attention:

First, there is a zero-tolerance for alcohol on the trail.  The rules of the trail are the same as the rules of the road.  No alcohol.  You risk your driver’s licence, your insurance, your life and the lives of other people.

Second, there is no reason to leave a mess like this.  If you pack it in, pack it out.

Finally, if you see a mess like this then think about the landowner.  Pack it out yourself or contact us at 519.266.3559 / info@dgatv.ca to have our Volunteers do the clean-up.  If we all want to ride then we all have a responsibility to keep the trail in good condition.

In this case, DGATV’s Executive are apologizing to the landowner and we hope we can make amends.  If not, part of the trail we are working to build has been lost.

Hopefully DGATV’s Executive members do not lose heart in the process.

Hopefully other landowners aren’t dissuaded by the inconsideration of a few bad apples.

Thoughtlessness like this causes more damage to recreational ATVing than you know.



 

Unauthorized Trail

This trail at Walters Falls is not part of our trail plan.  It was created by adventurers leaving the approved trail.  It is now permanently closed.  The reason?  It travels off the tract and on to the neighbour’s property who don’t want ATVs trespassing.

We like to be good neighbours.  Please stay on the approved trails or we run the risk of losing the entire area.

STAY ON TRAIL OR PERMISSION REVOKED

See also:

Maps

Volunteers

Young Riders



 

5 Ideas For Building ATV Ramps

Contributed by Jason Mueller

Loading an ATV into a truck seems like it would be a simple task to handle. However, it can not only be difficult but it can be dangerous. One thing to keep in mind is being safe when loading or unloading your ATV and you need to make sure you have the proper ramps to hold the weight of the bike and easily load it into the trailer. Whether you’re taking your ATV to the woods to get in a little playtime on a long trail ride or you just need to relocate the ATV, using the right ramps and loading techniques will go a long way to maintaining the condition of your ATV.

ATV ramps should not be pieces of flat wood or metal you may have laying around your tool shop. They need to be carefully chosen from a store or designed and crafted from the right material to handle the machine you want to load. You will need to be certain that the ramps are the right length for your truck bed or trailer. Modern trucks tend to be a little higher off the ground than some of the older trucks, so you will want to buy or build longer ramps if you plan to do the work on your own. You’ll also need to know how much your ATV weighs. This is extremely important when determining the materials to use on the ramp build.

In some instances, if you don’t own a truck or trailer to haul your own ATV, you can always contact an ATV shipping company (Canada, USA). The following ideas for building ramps to load ATVs in and out of trucks or trailers are great for those who are handy with building things, but alternatively, ramps can be purchased from an ATV shop or even a hardware shop locally.

Aluminum Diamond Plate Ramps

Using 3/16” aluminum diamond plate, a lot of weight can be held and it provides a sturdy, solid surface for ATVs. Making them around 5 feet long, you can bend up two channels and tie them together. Welding can be done for strength, but it is not necessary. Adding 4” tubes in the curls of the aluminum provides more strength to the ramps, making them ideal for moving ATVs.

Heavy Duty Steel Loading Ramps

Using 2×10 pieces of steel with a 3”x3/16 angle of iron down each of the sides provides more support. You do not have to weld the pieces together, but bolt each of the areas down. Adding ramp ends from a hardware store can provide even more stability and provide a way for the ramp to easily connect to the trailer or truck and ground.

Wood and Velcro

2×12 with 1/4” angled iron on one end of each board. Add industrial strength Velcro on the bottom sides of each one. This helped reduce slipping when pushing the ATV up the wood and into the bed of the truck.

Alternatively, you could screw eye bolts into the sides of the ends. Use tie downs to lock them in place on the bed of the truck so they do not slip, instead of the Velcro. Cutting the 2×12 in half so each is 6’ is ideal. Cutting them too short or keeping them too long puts too much stress on the wood. Remember wood is slick when wet so caution is recommended.

Wood with Supports

Using 2-2×6’s with 1×2’s every foot or so up each board provides more support when loading and unloading the ATV. Placing a 1×2 at the top of the board, as well as the bottom provides additional support so they do not slip out of place when being used. Again, slick when wet.

Treated Wood with Angles

Treated 2-2×12’s with 2×2 angles along each side of the 2×12’s provides additional support. The 2×2 angles helps with slippage since the angle holds onto the ends where they are placed. Making them just over 4 feet long is adequate to load the quads into a trailer without slippage and the treated wood is heartier, making them a more durable solution.

Remember, it is always recommended that you test for safety. It is better to be safe than sorry when it comes to loading your quad up, only to find out the ramp cannot hold the weight. Also, loading into the back of a trailer that is low to the ground, rather than into a higher elevated truck, is much easier to do when using ramps.

See also:

Keeping It Safe On the Trail

New Riders